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Become a Master

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ChablisBuddhaThe definition of a “master,” that is, a spiritual master, is a person who has had several enlightening experiences, at least two or three.

Second: In order to have enlightening experiences, you must learn to enter the true meditative state, which means sitting still and being awake, alert, free of drugs and alcohol, and most importantly without conscious thought (aka the Zen state).

Third: You must practice Zen meditation for 10 to 15 minutes every day. (Do it forever, which means at least until you die.) More than 15 minutes is okay, but not necessarily of value.

Fourth: Practice Zen faithfully and purposefully, learning over time to take your meditative state deeper and deeper.

Fifth: Sooner or later (and nobody knows how long you will need) you will become enlightened.

How to know if you’re enlightened: You will know. There will be no doubt. It is a euphoric event like nothing you’ve ever experienced before. You will discover your self-nature, meaning you will know who and what you are at the deepest level of your being without the masks and delusions created by your conscious mind. You will know your purpose in this life. You will experience profound inner peace (but only periodically, because you are still a human being).

Note: Please forgive the brief, terse way this is written. My goal was to impart the most important things I’ve learned, but in the fewest possible words. And in terms that are least likely to be misunderstood.

Namaste, ya’ll.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

October 3, 2019 at 5:02 pm

Why Seek Enlightenment?

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Many of us to want to know more. We want to understand more about who we are and why we are here. Is there a god? Most people want more knowledge about life after death. All these are reasons why religions were created. As human beings, we have a driving desire for answers to those questions, even if we suspect the answers aren’t really true. Enlightenment provides answers to those questions without the need of accepting Belief.

The differences between Enlightenment and Belief are huge. Enlightening knowledge springs from within. It is pre-programmed knowledge that comes already built into the human mind. On a physical and neurological level, it is primordial knowledge. It was already there at the time of birth.

Enlightenment doesn’t require any outside source. It doesn’t require trusting any other person. It doesn’t require the bodily senses to receive the information, and it doesn’t require the mind to interpret its meaning. Enlightenment is fully pre-packaged and already comprehended.

One of the first benefits is discovering your self-nature. That is, who you are and what you are at the deepest level of your being, all without the masks and delusions of your conscious thinking mind. That in itself is an extraordinary gift.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

January 28, 2019 at 3:49 pm

Who, Me? Asleep?

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Decades ago, I remember reading books by certain teachers and masters who asserted that I (and most people) are walking through life mostly asleep. That frustrated me, because I envisioned myself as a smart, alert person. What is it about my life that makes me “asleep?”

I recall a time when I once stood in front of a mirror and smacked myself in the face to see if that would have any effect. (It did not.)

Time went on, and I didn’t worry about it. I rarely thought about it. But all during that time I kept on with my meditation practice, which gave me a considerable amount of inner peace, steadiness, and balance—that I noticed most people around me didn’t have.

Years later, during one of my typical quiet early-morning meditations, my world was shaken by an enormous totally unexpected earth-shattering event. It seemed like a massive explosion near my house. Except it wasn’t. It was in my mind. It was an awakening, the likes of which I had never before imagined.

In one moment, I became separated from both my body and my mind—floating free in a dimensionless space. I was able to “see” like I had never imagined possible. I was able to view my body and my puny human mind as separate entities. Suddenly, I had vision and knowledge that is not possible in the ordinary human conscious state. There, for a brief few moments, I was awake.

In the minutes and hours after that meditation, I found that I could not recreate the type of vision I’d had. And I could recall only fragments of the knowledge I had experienced. At first I didn’t know if it had been a dream—or an actual experience. Which is why I began writing about it that same morning. I wanted to capture that experience in writing. And I wanted to prove to myself whether the experience was genuine or if I was losing my mind.

Several more “awakening” experiences happened to me during the next two years, which I faithfully recorded in my journal. One was an event where I discovered my self-nature, which among other things taught me who I am and what I am at the deepest level of my being, without the masks and delusions of my own conscious mind. That was powerful. And that made a big change in the way I live. Now, I’m sure I have a good idea what the masters meant when they wrote about sleepers.

One of my teachers, Osho, taught it this way: Silence is the space in which you can awaken. The noisy mind is the space where you will remain asleep. He’s right.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

August 7, 2017 at 1:10 am

Original Zen Now in Paperback

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It took me a year, but now it’s active and available on amazon. For several years, folks have urged me to put the Original Zen ebook into ink-on-paper. So this was my very first effort at turning an ebook into something that doesn’t require electricity or batteries. Of course, the ebook version is still available.

During this work, I revised and updated the ebook (from its original Sept 2013 version), adding a couple of chapters and some additional words and clarifications about things that weren’t clear enough to some readers. I introduced the notion of using mindfulness meditation as a stepping stone into the Zen state.

The first two paperback copies from amazon just arrived (only two days after ordering), and I’m very pleased with the result. It’s a 6×9 inch quality trade paperback with a full-color cover and 160 pages. At the back is a glossary of terms that might be useful to a new student. Right now the price is only $13, which in the future might have to go up a bit.

Click into Original Zen on amazon and take a look. Your feedback and comments will be greatly appreciated.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

June 10, 2017 at 1:30 pm

The Value of Aloneness

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Being alone can result in one of two states of mind: either loneliness or aloneness. The first is being alone and not happy about it. The second is being alone and liking it.

lonelygirl01I spent many of my younger years trying to avoid loneliness. And hating every minute I was lonely. I did all the typical things people do to avoid being alone. I scheduled my life so I’d be busy all the time. If I found myself alone for some reason, I’d make sure there were several radios and televisions making noise to keep my mind occupied. And during that time, I had no inkling of what aloneness was all about.

Then something happened way back when: I heard a song on the radio that reminded me that we all die alone. I know from stuff I learned in collidge that the human body dies from the outside in. That is, we lose contact with our sensory organs and our physical body while our mind is still functioning. So, that means my whole body will shut down and essentially be “dead” while I’m still alive somewhere deep in my brain. I imagined that could be utterly terrifying.

Then, a few decades ago and with the help of a teacher I know, I began deliberately changing my attitude about being alone. I began to appreciate aloneness. And that was about the same time I began loving myself a bit more than I had earlier in life. Looking back, this worked out very well with Zen meditation, and it really did enhance my practice.

In certain ways, aloneness and meditation are the same things. And in other perspectives, they are complementary and work well together.

Simply put, being alone with yourself and observing your mind is known as Mindfulness meditation. Being alone with yourself and not thinking is Zen meditation. I like to do both, sometimes alternating one with the other.

Now that I’m getting into my senior years, my meditations are sometimes very deep and I lose contact with my body for a while. In case I’ve never told you, that is a great experience. And not terrifying at all. For me, there’s not a shred of fear about the possibility of not “waking up.” I would just go on through the Window and see what happens next.

Let’s get back to the point of this blog. Aloneness is good. Start switching the gears in your mind to be more appreciative of aloneness. Even to the point of seeking it and planning for it. You don’t need the radios and TVs playing all the time. You don’t need somebody there for you all the time. And you don’t have to be “bored” by silence. You can learn to be comfortable and at ease being alone all by yourself. Just being with yourself.

Aloneness is a state that can be comforting and nourishing. It creates an atmosphere conducive to inner growth and self-development. It can also provide an opportunity for healing from the daily slings and arrows.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

February 20, 2017 at 8:20 am

Get Ready to Jump

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One of the nicest parts of becoming a spiritually aware person is a big change in attitude about “dying.” And by spiritually aware, I mean becoming aware of one’s spiritual being. (And as you should know by now, this does not entail any kind of religious belief.)

A person who spends enough time focused inward in search of his own self-nature, ultimately discovers an inner being known as the human spirit. That discovery is a significant step toward Enlightenment. It has a huge, life-changing effect on everyone who experiences it.

Stated simply, the human spirit is an energy form that cannot be destroyed. When the human body can no longer host its spiritual being (that it, the body “dies”), the spirit returns to its previous, non-physical, purely spiritual state. I like to think of it as a jump. When my body “gives up the ghost,” as it’s been called for millennia, I will make the jump back into the pure spiritual state. If you want to know why I’m so sure about that, ask me some time.

A well-spent life is one where a person spends sufficient time and energy in preparation for the jump. Part of that preparation is making a few practice jumps—something that can happen in a deep meditative state. Once you pass through the so-called Window of Light (and come back again), you’ll never be the same again.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

October 30, 2016 at 7:55 pm

The Joy of Being “Dead”

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Sure, many people will think I’m macabre. They’ll read the title above and turn the page—to get the awful thought of death out of their mind. But they’re missing the point.

You see, unless you have received enlightening meditative experiences, you’re not likely to remember what it was like to be “dead.” After all, before you were born, you were “dead.” Right? And after your body dies, you’ll be “dead” again, back where you came from. But if you were able to remember what it was like to be in the spiritual form, you would have a much different attitude about bodily death.

Among its many other benefits, Zen meditation is a way to connect to your human spirit, which is the non-physical energy form that lives within you. And in accordance with the natural laws of our universe, energy and matter aren’t created or destroyed, they are transformed from one state to another. The human spirit is an indestructible energy form.

The human spirit arrives in a new body with memories, knowledge, and experience from previous lives. And now, even though you may not be in touch with your own spiritual being, it is nevertheless recording experiences and gaining knowledge while it is living inside your present body. After it departs, it will carry some of your present life experiences with it, back into its “normal” spiritual state.

The “Joy” I’m writing about here comes from being free from the pain and suffering of the human condition. And the first question I usually get is: Won’t I miss food and sex? Nope, absolutely not. You’ll have something much, much better. So much better the human mind can’t fully grasp it.

Let’s take sex, for example. In the human form, people make love by getting their bodies plastered together as close as possible. But that closeness is always limited by their physical bodies. Each person is still alone inside his own body and mind. There’s no way for humans to have physical union totally inside each other. The closest we can get is with our genitals, male inside the female—which pales in comparison.

But in the spiritual state, two beings can merge totally and occupy the same “time and space” inside each other. That is a total spiritual union, something far greater than ordinary human orgasm. The two individuals become one. There is no separation of any kind. It is an indescribable joy.

Enlightened people understand these rewards. And most of them get very excited about the prospect of returning to the spiritual state. And that, of course, provides a lot of motivation to deepen their meditative experiences. After experiencing just a brief taste of these experiences, a practitioner’s attitude about dying changes enormously.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

May 25, 2016 at 5:12 pm