Finding Inner Calm and Deeper Wisdom

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Archive for the ‘quiet mind’ Category

Use Your Loneliness

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I hate to feel lonely. Don’t you?

Believe me, I have had some long stretches of loneliness in my lifetime. But in recent years, I’ve managed to solve that problem almost entirely. I say almost, because I’m not a hermit, and for my own mental health I need to have people around me some of the time. Or maybe a lot of the time. And, I especially need a life partner for several reasons—but now is not the time to discuss that.

What I discovered was How to Use Loneliness. And how to stay emotionally stable and even happy when I am lonely. It was a stepwise learning lesson for me. Here, I’m going to describe the first level of how I escaped the pain of Loneliness and its twin problem: Depression.

My huge discovery was using writing alternated with meditation. It was huge for me. It might not work for everybody, but it should work for most people. It’s so simple. I should have thought of this fifty years ago. Here’s what I do when I’m lonely.

Step one, believe it or not, is actually recognizing that I’m lonely. Sometimes I’ll mope around for a while, not feeling very good about life, then I’ll have a eureka moment. And recognize that I’m lonely!

Step two: I grab a pad of paper and a ballpoint. I start writing about whatever is on my mind. Or whatever in life is troubling me. Or maybe, I’ll just start writing about a favorite topic that energizes me.

Step three: When I reach a point in the writing where I can’t think of what to write next, I stop. I grab a favorite cushion and sit in Zen meditation for a while. That usually lasts no longer than twelve to fifteen minutes. Sometimes it will last longer, especially if I’m having a bad case of the blues.

Step four: Repeat the writing and meditation until I feel better. Or it’s time to take a shower and take a walk. Or read an interesting book. Or maybe treat myself to a healthy lunch. Or have a date with a special friend.

Why does it work? Writing is an excellent form of self-therapy. Writing will often let one part of your mind express something that another part of your mind didn’t know. Then, the meditation will let your mind process that knowledge and help heal a part of the mind that was hurting.

Another benefit of this process is that it turns loneliness into aloneness—which is being alone but feeling better about it.

Let me know if this works for you.

Become a Master

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ChablisBuddhaThe definition of a “master,” that is, a spiritual master, is a person who has had several enlightening experiences, at least two or three.

Second: In order to have enlightening experiences, you must learn to enter the true meditative state, which means sitting still and being awake, alert, free of drugs and alcohol, and most importantly without conscious thought (aka the Zen state).

Third: You must practice Zen meditation for 10 to 15 minutes every day. (Do it forever, which means at least until you die.) More than 15 minutes is okay, but not necessarily of value.

Fourth: Practice Zen faithfully and purposefully, learning over time to take your meditative state deeper and deeper.

Fifth: Sooner or later (and nobody knows how long you will need) you will become enlightened.

How to know if you’re enlightened: You will know. There will be no doubt. It is a euphoric event like nothing you’ve ever experienced before. You will discover your self-nature, meaning you will know who and what you are at the deepest level of your being without the masks and delusions created by your conscious mind. You will know your purpose in this life. You will experience profound inner peace (but only periodically, because you are still a human being).

Note: Please forgive the brief, terse way this is written. My goal was to impart the most important things I’ve learned, but in the fewest possible words. And in terms that are least likely to be misunderstood.

Namaste, ya’ll.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

October 3, 2019 at 5:02 pm

There is Stress

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There will always be Stress. That is because Stress is a normal and natural part of the universe. There has always been Stress. Just the fact that we live on a ball of dirt and water, hurtling through space with gravity gluing us to its surface–is Stress. We might as well get used to it. But that doesn’t mean we have to continuously suffer from it.

The Problem with Stress is that we internalize it. We worry about it. We open our mind and allow it to come inside, where it proceeds to gnaw at us without mercy. The human mind has been doing that since we lived in trees. The answer to the Stress Problem is to NOT internalize it. Isn’t that easy?

Ah yes, that’s so easy to say, but not so easy to do. So, let’s break it down and make it a bit easier to do. “Internalizing” some external thing in our life actually and simply means “thinking about it.” If you think about it, you are internalizing it. If you don’t think about it, you’re not internalizing it.

This is where so many people say, “But not thinking about it means I’m just running away from the problem.” Thus, based on their idea of being mature and responsible, they think. And think, and think. And wear themselves out by thinking. Like a rat in a roundhouse, running around and around. Which is is a terrible form of self-torment, agony, suffering, and self-abuse.

Therefore, your clear solution to Stress is not thinking about whatever you have to worry about. Or, better yet, controlling your thinking machine so that it only worries when you want it to. I advise people to write down everything they are worried about, and then study that list for one hour at 7 p.m. Or at 10 a.m. in the morning. Or maybe for a half hour at noon. Whatever gives you the feeling that you’re being “responsible.” The rest of the time you have my permission to not think about all that stuff.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

April 22, 2019 at 10:25 am

Can’t Sleep?

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NINE PEOPLE I know have told me in the last month they can’t sleep. During my haircut Saturday, my hairdresser Rae-Lynn was yawning so badly I worried she might accidentally stab me with her scissors. I asked why she couldn’t sleep, as I often do with yawning people. She had the same answer as the others: “My mind was racing and wouldn’t let me sleep.” What a shame.

I should do something about that problem. Because, if there’s anything I’m a master of, it’s sleeping. I can snooooze like you wouldn’t believe—I’m fortunate to have deep and restful sleep.

Sure, I had sleep problems caused by stress when I was in the military. Which was understandable, because back then I was certain that people were trying to kill me. But, an old Tibetan monk taught me how to calm down and go to sleep even when I was scared out of my wits.

Now, I can go to sleep under extraordinary pressure. So, I should teach my insomniac friends how I do it. I imagine that if I put some effort into it, I could do damage to the sleeping pill industry.

The trick is mind control: Learning to stop the thinking machine. Another word for that is meditation. I’ve been doing it so long that I can’t remember not being able to do it. It’s so easy.

Not long ago, I sat down and wrote everything I know about Zen meditation in a book. It’s called Original Zen and can be found on amazon.com in paperback. It is also an ebook you can download to your device. If there is anything in the book that doesn’t make sense, send me an email. I will do my best to explain it.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

January 24, 2019 at 12:24 pm

Using My Angel Hour

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Just in case you don’t know what I mean by my angel hour, let me define it. When you wake up at some time between 4 and 5 a.m. and you don’t feel sleepy, maybe you’re having an angel hour. Go ahead and meditate to stop your mind, and see if you can go back to sleep.

RelaxedGirlIf you can’t sleep, your deeper mind may be trying to tell you something. So continue meditating to slow down and/or stop your conscious thinking. Stay very relaxed and very still. Soon, you won’t be entirely awake but you also won’t be entirely asleep. That is a good state to be in.

That very relaxed state of half asleep is an angel hour. When it happens, stay with it. I guess during this state of mind, people think angels are speaking to them. Who knows. Maybe so.

You might receive valuable knowledge. Or perhaps answers to a problem that has been bothering you. Or maybe not. You never know.

In any case, it’s a good place to be. During that time, you’re getting both physical and mental rest. It’s nearly as good as sleep. Some times—maybe not all the time—but for sure some of those times, you will receive deep-mind information that you might otherwise never know about. Your deep mind understands things unknown to your conscious mind. Among other things, that can be pure wisdom. It also allows you to clearly see your own intuition that applies to some matter concerning you. In some rare instances, you might receive genuine enlightening experiences.

In years past, it took a while for me to recognize an angel hour. I would get annoyed that I couldn’t go back to sleep. But then, after I realized what was going on, I relaxed into it. And I was often rewarded.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

January 4, 2019 at 3:31 pm

Looking for The Answer?

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Finding the right path to take when searching for inner peace and Enlightenment can be difficult and confusing. Almost every possibility means giving up one set of beliefs and adopting another. The best advice might be: Don’t adopt any belief system. There’s no need for it, and besides, you’re vulnerable to being led down a wrong path.

The old monk Bodhidharma decided to ignore everything the world wanted him to believe. He believed in No Belief. Instead, he sat alone in a cave and stared at a rock wall. It worked for him. Now he’s known as the world greatest Zen master. He went to heights of spiritual experiences that we can only imagine.

Why did it work? Because his conscious mind shut down now and then, and let deeper, more powerful parts of his mind take over.

You don’t need to sit in a cave. You just need to sit all alone in a quiet place and stop your mind. That’s called Zen. But if you can’t stop your mind (yet), then just watch it and make notes about everything it does. That’s called Mindful Meditation, and it’s the main path to Zen.

You don’t need any gods, dogma, disciples, preachers, scriptures, prayers, or belief system. Absolutely none of that stuff. And you don’t have to do any ritual whatsoever except sitting in your quiet place—just for a little while, most every day.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

November 22, 2018 at 1:26 pm

“Ultra” Meditation

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This is a meditation technique I discovered on my own. It might have been discovered thousands of years ago and documented in some ancient text. But I’ve never heard of it (yet). If somebody has read about this, please let me know where.

renPlaya_2x2Here’s how it works: After I’ve slept a while and I’m well rested, I might drift into a kind of meditative state that takes me much deeper than usual. I never know when this is likely to happen. I’m lying in bed ready to resume sleeping, but I’m not sleepy yet. I put my body into a position where I have minimum or no stress on any joint, and I don’t have any limb resting on another. Usually this means lying on my side. It’s important to note that I have to be well rested when I do this.

As you may know, I don’t advise trying to meditate lying down and especially not in bed. The chief problem is you’re more likely to fall sleep. But if you’ve just slept and you feel rested, this may work for you.

Scan your body and locate any body part that is uncomfortable, and make whatever adjustment is necessary. Stop all thought and use the mind to watch your heartbeat and breathing. Eventually, the heart will slow down and the breathing will get shallow.

After a while, as I lie there in the meditative state, I gradually sink in to an ever greater, deeper Zen state. The feeling is like separating from my physical body. During that time, the body seems to sink into an insignificant puddle of inert matter lying in my bed. It is no longer “me.” I’m sure this is what some people call an out of body experience.

I have the feeling that optionally I could return to my body. Or, if I wanted, just not return. I get a peculiar feeling of exhiliarating power, in which I could continue on farther away from my body—or onward to the pure spiritual state if I wished—or else return to my body.

Thus far, I’ve always come back. But if I were to proceed, would it really work? Would I actually transition? I don’t know. Aside from that, I’ve always returned to a super peaceful and ethereal state of mind afterward.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

November 2, 2018 at 11:47 pm