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Become a Master

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ChablisBuddhaThe definition of a “master,” that is, a spiritual master, is a person who has had several enlightening experiences, at least two or three.

Second: In order to have enlightening experiences, you must learn to enter the true meditative state, which means sitting still and being awake, alert, free of drugs and alcohol, and most importantly without conscious thought (aka the Zen state).

Third: You must practice Zen meditation for 10 to 15 minutes every day. (Do it forever, which means at least until you die.) More than 15 minutes is okay, but not necessarily of value.

Fourth: Practice Zen faithfully and purposefully, learning over time to take your meditative state deeper and deeper.

Fifth: Sooner or later (and nobody knows how long you will need) you will become enlightened.

How to know if you’re enlightened: You will know. There will be no doubt. It is a euphoric event like nothing you’ve ever experienced before. You will discover your self-nature, meaning you will know who and what you are at the deepest level of your being without the masks and delusions created by your conscious mind. You will know your purpose in this life. You will experience profound inner peace (but only periodically, because you are still a human being).

Note: Please forgive the brief, terse way this is written. My goal was to impart the most important things I’ve learned, but in the fewest possible words. And in terms that are least likely to be misunderstood.

Namaste, ya’ll.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

October 3, 2019 at 5:02 pm

Impossible Dream?

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A few months ago, an unusual dream came to me during my early morning Angel Hour, I think it was about 4 a.m. and still dark outside. The dream was unusual in several respects, but most significantly it created a lasting impression in my mind. As we know, most dreams fade during the daylight hours. Often by late morning, I can’t remember anything about a dream I had during the night.

So maybe this wasn’t a dream after all. Rather, it might have been what could be called a “spiritual experience?” I think it must have come from somewhere deep in my own Human Spirit. In any event, a clear memory of it persists even today.

A young dark-skinned man was walking along a dusty road dressed in the white ceremonial clothing of a martyr. He wore a deadly suicide vest. His faced showed grim, determination. He was carrying out the plan he’d been trained for. But then, as he walked, he received spiritual Enlightenment. He stopped. The hard look of hatred disappeared from his face. He smiled. He removed the vest and threw it into a ditch. He turned around and headed back to his own village.

Later that morning, my conscious mind filled in the rest of the story. That would-be mass murderer, instead of carrying out the plan he had been indoctrinated for, returned to his home and to his family. He resolved himself to go to work and help his family and his people have a better life.

Is such a thing possible? Can people who have been brainwashed and indoctrinated as terrorist killers actually open their mind to receive enlightening knowledge? I’ve been thinking seriously about that possibility.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

June 21, 2019 at 11:15 am

Why Seek Enlightenment?

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Many of us to want to know more. We want to understand more about who we are and why we are here. Is there a god? Most people want more knowledge about life after death. All these are reasons why religions were created. As human beings, we have a driving desire for answers to those questions, even if we suspect the answers aren’t really true. Enlightenment provides answers to those questions without the need of accepting Belief.

The differences between Enlightenment and Belief are huge. Enlightening knowledge springs from within. It is pre-programmed knowledge that comes already built into the human mind. On a physical and neurological level, it is primordial knowledge. It was already there at the time of birth.

Enlightenment doesn’t require any outside source. It doesn’t require trusting any other person. It doesn’t require the bodily senses to receive the information, and it doesn’t require the mind to interpret its meaning. Enlightenment is fully pre-packaged and already comprehended.

One of the first benefits is discovering your self-nature. That is, who you are and what you are at the deepest level of your being, all without the masks and delusions of your conscious thinking mind. That in itself is an extraordinary gift.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

January 28, 2019 at 3:49 pm

Using My Angel Hour

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Just in case you don’t know what I mean by my angel hour, let me define it. When you wake up at some time between 4 and 5 a.m. and you don’t feel sleepy, maybe you’re having an angel hour. Go ahead and meditate to stop your mind, and see if you can go back to sleep.

RelaxedGirlIf you can’t sleep, your deeper mind may be trying to tell you something. So continue meditating to slow down and/or stop your conscious thinking. Stay very relaxed and very still. Soon, you won’t be entirely awake but you also won’t be entirely asleep. That is a good state to be in.

That very relaxed state of half asleep is an angel hour. When it happens, stay with it. I guess during this state of mind, people think angels are speaking to them. Who knows. Maybe so.

You might receive valuable knowledge. Or perhaps answers to a problem that has been bothering you. Or maybe not. You never know.

In any case, it’s a good place to be. During that time, you’re getting both physical and mental rest. It’s nearly as good as sleep. Some times—maybe not all the time—but for sure some of those times, you will receive deep-mind information that you might otherwise never know about. Your deep mind understands things unknown to your conscious mind. Among other things, that can be pure wisdom. It also allows you to clearly see your own intuition that applies to some matter concerning you. In some rare instances, you might receive genuine enlightening experiences.

In years past, it took a while for me to recognize an angel hour. I would get annoyed that I couldn’t go back to sleep. But then, after I realized what was going on, I relaxed into it. And I was often rewarded.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

January 4, 2019 at 3:31 pm

What’s Holding You Back?

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What is holding you back from attaining genuine peace of mind? What denies you the ability of staying calm and centered? What’s keeping you from achieving the true YogaGirlmeditative state? Why haven’t you had spiritual learning experiences? And most of all, what is holding you back from receiving Enlightenment?

You might guess that, because I’m asking these questions, I think I know the answer. Well yes, I actually do have an answer. Other people may have other answers, for sure. I can only offer you what I’ve learned from my own experiences and perceptions as a meditation “teacher.”

The answer is in one word: Stress.

Of all the millions of people who want to develop a useful and rewarding meditative practice, the primary reason that most of them can’t get there is Stress. When they sit down to meditate, they close their eyes, and they are immediately bombarded with unwanted thoughts and images. The underlying cause in most cases is stress. They want to achieve a quiet mind and instead, the energy boiling up from stress makes their mind sound like Radio San Juan. A non-stop series of staccato car commercials.

Many masters and teachers over the centuries have known this. Recent studies show that over two thirds of people in the U.S. suffer from a specific type of stress, namely: Post Traumatic Stress (PTS). That is stress caused by earlier injury in life, injury that has not healed.

My take on this: A person’s meditation will always be limited to some degree by unhealed trauma.

Some teachers claim that meditation can overcome PTS. That has not been my experience. Meditation is often useful for discovering (i.e., remembering) earlier unhealed trauma. And while meditation may give the student small periods of rest and recovery time, it rarely cures the problem.

So yes, by all means meditate regularly. But keep a journal of everything that disturbs your meditations. Then go back and read your notes now and then. What you have written may point you to things you weren’t consciously aware of. And when you find a persistent blockage, rejoice! Because what you’ve found may be a huge prize. It might be the key to great forward progress in your spiritual development.

First and foremost, be aware that it might scare you. Coming up against an area that blocks you is usually frightening. You may not know exactly why it scares you. But there is something behind the blockage that wounded you in the past. And it hasn’t healed.

That has happened to me three times in my life. Maybe more than three, but I remember three very clearly. In every one of those cases, I used another person to help me get past the block, find the traumatic event, and then resolve it. In one case it was a hypnotist, in another it was a close friend, and the third was a shrink.

I learned many decades ago: Explore inward until you find the monster. Then, embrace the monster. It will no longer frighten you, and it will always give you a huge gift.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

December 15, 2018 at 2:06 pm

Looking for The Answer?

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Finding the right path to take when searching for inner peace and Enlightenment can be difficult and confusing. Almost every possibility means giving up one set of beliefs and adopting another. The best advice might be: Don’t adopt any belief system. There’s no need for it, and besides, you’re vulnerable to being led down a wrong path.

The old monk Bodhidharma decided to ignore everything the world wanted him to believe. He believed in No Belief. Instead, he sat alone in a cave and stared at a rock wall. It worked for him. Now he’s known as the world greatest Zen master. He went to heights of spiritual experiences that we can only imagine.

Why did it work? Because his conscious mind shut down now and then, and let deeper, more powerful parts of his mind take over.

You don’t need to sit in a cave. You just need to sit all alone in a quiet place and stop your mind. That’s called Zen. But if you can’t stop your mind (yet), then just watch it and make notes about everything it does. That’s called Mindful Meditation, and it’s the main path to Zen.

You don’t need any gods, dogma, disciples, preachers, scriptures, prayers, or belief system. Absolutely none of that stuff. And you don’t have to do any ritual whatsoever except sitting in your quiet place—just for a little while, most every day.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

November 22, 2018 at 1:26 pm

Who, Me? Asleep?

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Decades ago, I remember reading books by certain teachers and masters who asserted that I (and most people) are walking through life mostly asleep. That frustrated me, because I envisioned myself as a smart, alert person. What is it about my life that makes me “asleep?”

I recall a time when I once stood in front of a mirror and smacked myself in the face to see if that would have any effect. (It did not.)

Time went on, and I didn’t worry about it. I rarely thought about it. But all during that time I kept on with my meditation practice, which gave me a considerable amount of inner peace, steadiness, and balance—that I noticed most people around me didn’t have.

Years later, during one of my typical quiet early-morning meditations, my world was shaken by an enormous totally unexpected earth-shattering event. It seemed like a massive explosion near my house. Except it wasn’t. It was in my mind. It was an awakening, the likes of which I had never before imagined.

In one moment, I became separated from both my body and my mind—floating free in a dimensionless space. I was able to “see” like I had never imagined possible. I was able to view my body and my puny human mind as separate entities. Suddenly, I had vision and knowledge that is not possible in the ordinary human conscious state. There, for a brief few moments, I was awake.

In the minutes and hours after that meditation, I found that I could not recreate the type of vision I’d had. And I could recall only fragments of the knowledge I had experienced. At first I didn’t know if it had been a dream—or an actual experience. Which is why I began writing about it that same morning. I wanted to capture that experience in writing. And I wanted to prove to myself whether the experience was genuine or if I was losing my mind.

Several more “awakening” experiences happened to me during the next two years, which I faithfully recorded in my journal. One was an event where I discovered my self-nature, which among other things taught me who I am and what I am at the deepest level of my being, without the masks and delusions of my own conscious mind. That was powerful. And that made a big change in the way I live. Now, I’m sure I have a good idea what the masters meant when they wrote about sleepers.

One of my teachers, Osho, taught it this way: Silence is the space in which you can awaken. The noisy mind is the space where you will remain asleep. He’s right.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

August 7, 2017 at 1:10 am

Get Ready to Jump

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One of the nicest parts of becoming a spiritually aware person is a big change in attitude about “dying.” And by spiritually aware, I mean becoming aware of one’s spiritual being. (And as you should know by now, this does not entail any kind of religious belief.)

A person who spends enough time focused inward in search of his own self-nature, ultimately discovers an inner being known as the human spirit. That discovery is a significant step toward Enlightenment. It has a huge, life-changing effect on everyone who experiences it.

Stated simply, the human spirit is an energy form that cannot be destroyed. When the human body can no longer host its spiritual being (that it, the body “dies”), the spirit returns to its previous, non-physical, purely spiritual state. I like to think of it as a jump. When my body “gives up the ghost,” as it’s been called for millennia, I will make the jump back into the pure spiritual state. If you want to know why I’m so sure about that, ask me some time.

A well-spent life is one where a person spends sufficient time and energy in preparation for the jump. Part of that preparation is making a few practice jumps—something that can happen in a deep meditative state. Once you pass through the so-called Window of Light (and come back again), you’ll never be the same again.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

October 30, 2016 at 7:55 pm

The Joy of Being “Dead”

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Sure, many people will think I’m macabre. They’ll read the title above and turn the page—to get the awful thought of death out of their mind. But they’re missing the point.

You see, unless you have received enlightening meditative experiences, you’re not likely to remember what it was like to be “dead.” After all, before you were born, you were “dead.” Right? And after your body dies, you’ll be “dead” again, back where you came from. But if you were able to remember what it was like to be in the spiritual form, you would have a much different attitude about bodily death.

Among its many other benefits, Zen meditation is a way to connect to your human spirit, which is the non-physical energy form that lives within you. And in accordance with the natural laws of our universe, energy and matter aren’t created or destroyed, they are transformed from one state to another. The human spirit is an indestructible energy form.

The human spirit arrives in a new body with memories, knowledge, and experience from previous lives. And now, even though you may not be in touch with your own spiritual being, it is nevertheless recording experiences and gaining knowledge while it is living inside your present body. After it departs, it will carry some of your present life experiences with it, back into its “normal” spiritual state.

The “Joy” I’m writing about here comes from being free from the pain and suffering of the human condition. And the first question I usually get is: Won’t I miss food and sex? Nope, absolutely not. You’ll have something much, much better. So much better the human mind can’t fully grasp it.

Let’s take sex, for example. In the human form, people make love by getting their bodies plastered together as close as possible. But that closeness is always limited by their physical bodies. Each person is still alone inside his own body and mind. There’s no way for humans to have physical union totally inside each other. The closest we can get is with our genitals, male inside the female—which pales in comparison.

But in the spiritual state, two beings can merge totally and occupy the same “time and space” inside each other. That is a total spiritual union, something far greater than ordinary human orgasm. The two individuals become one. There is no separation of any kind. It is an indescribable joy.

Enlightened people understand these rewards. And most of them get very excited about the prospect of returning to the spiritual state. And that, of course, provides a lot of motivation to deepen their meditative experiences. After experiencing just a brief taste of these experiences, a practitioner’s attitude about dying changes enormously.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

May 25, 2016 at 5:12 pm

People Who Laugh at Death

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Why do people who receive enlightening experiences have no fear of death? Are they just out of their mind, or do they know something that we don’t know?

GreatAlexander_1x1The correct answer: Some of both.

Enlightenment is an experience that opens avenues in the mind not available to a typical person. Let me be clear: This is not a new-age, pop culture fantasy that came from smoking too much weed. Rather, it is one of the most well-known benefits of Zen meditation, something known and taught by masters over thousands of years.

A long-term practice of Zen typically results in the creation of new neural pathways that allow the practitioner to have out-of-body and out-of-mind experiences during meditation. Now, hold that thought for a minute.

Have you heard about people who’ve had near-death experiences or who actually died, were resuscitated, and who experienced passing through the legendary Window of Light? Enlightened Zen practitioners are people who have visited the Window but without the necessity of dying. They experienced the process of passing through the Window—and then coming back. Quite a few of them are walking around the planet today. We call them “masters.” And you can believe me, they know something other people don’t know—they know there is no such thing as “death.”

Wow, what a life-changing, world-transforming concept. That’s chiefly because when your spirit is on the other side of the Window, it can see things a mortal human cannot see. You’re able to grasp a bigger picture than the ordinary human mind can comprehend. Or can be expressed in our pathetically inadequate human languages. Nevertheless, after you’ve been there, you know that death of the human body is just a transformation. It’s merely the next step. It’s the start of a whole new chapter.

This is why Zen practitioners might giggle during a funeral. It really, really is a cause for celebration.

Written by Eduardo Mitchell

May 2, 2016 at 2:14 pm